The town of Hilo has a certain irresistible charm.
Described by many as one of the few places left to experience old Hawai'i. The town is friendly, laid-back, and you can't help but slow down, take a couple of breaths, and realize that this is what Hawai'i is supposed to be like. We don't want you to slow down too much though; we have some adventuring to do!
BIG VOLCANO TOUR HIGHLIGHTS

•KAUMANA LAVA TUBE
•SADDLE ROAD
•KOHALA COAST
•HAWI TOWN
•POLOLU VALLEY
•KOHALA MOUNTAIN ROAD
•WAIMEA TOWN
•HAMAKUA COAST
•THE BIG ISLAND'S PUNA DISTRICT
•KILAUEA'S STEAMING BLUFFS
•KILAUEA VOLCANO SUMMIT
•KILAUEA CALDERA
•THURSTON LAVA TUBE & KILAUEA IKI CRATER
•CHAIN OF CRATERS ROAD
•MAUNA ULU ERUPTION AREA

BIG VOLCANO TOUR SUMMARY

PICK UP FROM HILO: Your day starts early at around 9am and typically last about 13 hours. Your pickup time will vary depending on if you are sharing your adventure with another small group, or if your group is exclusive. We operate on first come first served. If you are first to book any given day, you’ll be the first to be picked up and get a choice of seating in the van.

JOURNEY ON SADDLE ROAD TO WAIMEA: After we're all strapped in and ready to go, the adventure begins as we head west out of Hilo along Saddle road. The first portion fo the journy takes us to the along famous Saddle Road. Saddle Road crests at 6632. What was warm and confortable in Hilo, will most likely be very chilly and windy near the crest of the road. We will pass through the rainforests of Hilo to the upper lava desert and scrubland of the crest. If conditions permit, you will receive stunning views of our planet's largest volcano, Mauna Loa, as well as glimpses of her neighbor Hualalai. As we approach Waimea, we will pass near the clouds at crest before going back down towards Waimea town.

WAIMEA TO POLOLU VALLEY: After our decent into Waimea we will continue our adventure along the Kohala coast towards the Pololu Valley. During this trip you will notice a 15-20 degree deperature increase as we go from the temperate climate in Waimea to near desert conditions along the Kohala coast. Once at the coast, you will be treated to gorgeous views of Kohala volcano on one side, and Haleakala on neighboring island Maui on the other. Your photo opportunities are endless once we reach the Pololu Valley.

KOHALA MOUNTAIN ROAD: Your introduction to the Kohala volcano begins on the Kohala Mountain Road. Right away you'll see that this differs from the other volcanoes on the island. Being the oldest, Kohala has had some time to settle down and relax, and is now home to one of the oldest and largest working cattle ranches in the country, Parker Ranch. As we climb into the clouds the rolling green pastureland seems to go on forever.

KOHALA TO KILAUEA: I suppose you could say we've saved the best for last. After all, Kilauea volcano is that star of the show. The nearly 100 mile journey will take us through often windy and rainey Waimea and south along Hawai'i's famous Hamakua coast. Along the way, we'll take a quick detour to check out one of the must stunning features on the Big Island, Waipio Valley. Once we're at Kilauea and Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, we'll explore the summit area and chain of craters road which leads down to the coast. The tour typically ends around sundown, where if lucky, you'll be treated to the glow of the lava lake from Kilauea's famous summit pit-crater, Hale'ma'uma'u.

BELOW YOU'LL FIND THE LINK TO OUR BOOKING FORM. PRIOR TO YOUR TOUR, YOU WILL BE REQUIRED TO SIGN AND SUBMIT A RELEASE FORM.

WHAT TO BRING

CAMERA: This one is optional, but we do recommend that you bring a camera. You will definately see something fantastic, and you'll definately want to share it with you friends and family back home.

FOOD: Lunch will be provided on every tour. Sandwhiches, drinks, and snacks will served, however, anything outside of that will be your responsability.

WALKING STICKS: We will be walking on some un-even ground. Those of you who aren't sure-footed, may be best helped by bringing a walking stick along. Plus it adds a certain mystique.

WHAT TO WEAR

PANTS, JACKETS, & HATS: Despite being in Hawai’I, it can get a little chilly up on Kilauea. Pants will help to cut the breeze and if you should trip, protect your skin against getting cut-up on the lava rock during hikes. Hawai’I is at the same latitude as the Sahara desert; regardless of a cooler temperature, the sun is still pretty strong. A hat, particular one of the larger, silly-looking ones, will help to protect your head and neck from the sun’s rays.

HIKING BOOTS: We won’t be doing any heavy-duty hiking; however, we sill encourage you to bring hiking boats along. We DO NOT RECOMMEND WEARING SANDLES. Hiking boats will give your feet extra protection and traction while walking on lava trails. Sandals can potentially be ripped apart, making the rest of the tour very uncomfortable.

SUNSCREEN: See Pants, Jackets, & Hats above. The sun can burn you, regardless of temperature.

WHAT TO EXPECT

MOLTEN LAVA: As we have stated many times throughout this side, the viewing of molten lava is not guaranteed, and is most often not expected. Typically, lava erupts outside of the general access of the population. However, there are times when flows will break out allowing for easier access and viewing. Most of the time though, seeing molten lava is a rare possibility.

HIKING: The best way to see a good majority of the sites is by walking. You can get a good feel for it by driving by, but in order to experience it, you need to get out of the van. In total, we will be walking about 4 miles over 5 trails. The trails are maintained fairly well, but are uneven in spots due to the natural geography of the land.

DELAYS AND CLOSURES: Unfortutely, we have no control of nature. Do to mostly volcanic circumstances, Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park and any road within can close at a moments notice. This goes for any road on the Big Island of Hawaii as well. There aren't many alternative routes like on the mainland. If an area closes and we expect it to effect our tour, we will let you know and discuss options with you.

AIR QUALITY: The air quality on Kilauea (or any active other volcano for that matter) is generally poor. It is recommened that individuals with breathing ailments and conditions use exteme caution when venturing into these areas. We will be visiting locations where sulfer and carbon dioxide are in great abundance

FEEL FREE TO DOWNLOAD OUR VOLCANO VAN CHECKLIST BY CLICKING HERE